ENG1W

NCEA L1 English - War, What is it Good For?

Course Description

Teacher in Charge: Ms J. McLeod

The war genre has been, and still is, a popular one in literature. It is fascinating to trace the changing portrayal of war through the ages - from Alfred, Lord Tennyson's 'glorious' Charge of the Light Brigade published in 1854, right through to David Ayer's harrowing second world war film Fury, which graphically reveals "what a man can do to another man."

So, if you enjoy war stories - be it films, short stories, novels, poetry or non-fiction texts - then this is the course for you.

English as a subject area focuses on the two key strands – making meaning and creating meaning. We focus on communication through a range of texts and mediums to reflect societal changes and 21st Century learning foci. English encompasses learning the language, using the language and thinking beyond the language through authentic learning contexts.

Specifically, this involves learners being willing to have their ideas challenged; to developing their own ideas and opinions through critical literacy and working on the skills required to be confident using their own personal voice.




Course Overview

Term 1
We start by asking the question ' why do young men go to war?' We will be reading and watching a range of texts that look at this question, with a particular focus on New Zealanders at war.

Our novel study this term will also be linked to the above question.

Term 2
This term we will be making connections. You will have the opportunity to look at how and especially why texts position readers to understand key ideas.

Term 3
The focus this term will be on close viewing. You will have the opportunity to explore how film makers craft their work to obtain a desired result. We will also be practicing our literature essay writing skills, in preparation for the derived grade exams.

Term 4
Term 4 is all about revising for the final exams in November.

Recommended Prior Learning

Open entry.

Credit Information

This course is eligible for subject endorsement.

Total Credits Available: 19 credits.
Externally Assessed Credits: 8 credits.
Internally Assessed Credits: 11 credits.

Assessment
Description
Level
Internal or
External
Credits
L1 Literacy Credits
UE Literacy Credits
Numeracy Credits
A.S. 90849 v3
NZQA Info
English 1.1 - Show understanding of specified aspect(s) of studied written text(s), using supporting evidence
4
4
4
4
4
4
Level: 1
Internal or External: External
Credits: 4
Level 1 Literacy Credits: Y
University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Numeracy Credits: 0
A.S. 90851 v2
NZQA Info
English 1.3 - Show understanding of significant aspects of unfamiliar written text(s) through close reading, using supporting evidence
4
4
4
4
4
4
Level: 1
Internal or External: External
Credits: 4
Level 1 Literacy Credits: Y
University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Numeracy Credits: 0
A.S. 90852 v2
NZQA Info
English 1.8 - Explain significant connection(s) across texts, using supporting evidence
4
4
4
4
4
4
Level: 1
Internal or External: Internal
Credits: 4
Level 1 Literacy Credits: Y
University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Numeracy Credits: 0
A.S. 90854 v2
NZQA Info
English 1.10 - Form personal responses to independently read texts, supported by evidence
4
4
4
4
4
4
Level: 1
Internal or External: Internal
Credits: 4
Level 1 Literacy Credits: Y
University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Numeracy Credits: 0
A.S. 90856 v2
NZQA Info
English 1.11 - Show understanding of visual and/or oral text(s) through close viewing and/or listening, using supporting evidence
3
3
3
3
3
Level: 1
Internal or External: Internal
Credits: 3
Level 1 Literacy Credits: Y
University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Numeracy Credits: 0
Credit Summary
Total Credits: 19
Total Level 1 Literacy Credits: 19
Total University Entrance Literacy Credits: 0
Total Numeracy Credits: 0